Our Brain Is Like A Television

Old brown television on stand playing movie

Tuning Into Different Channels

Our brain is a receiver of information; it scans the environment to retrieve everything that it detects with the senses: sight, smell, hearing, taste and touch. Some would go as far to say that we also have a sixth sense. This sixth sense is a different channel that we are all capable of tuning into; we just have to learn how to tap into the parallel universe that it belongs to.

Tuning into different channels is not something that we live our lives thinking about. Usually, mystics, those who practice meditation and users of psychedelic drugs are interested in tapping into different states of consciousness. These different states of consciousness are the different channels that our brain can switch on for us to enjoy.

But how do we tap into these channels and why is it so difficult? It’s believed that we weren’t designed to tap into these channels in the first place; our brain remains on the “normal channel” or what is perceived to be everyday reality. It’s also believed that parallel universes may exist and that humans only have access to them through certain tools.

The next question becomes, are we allowed to access these parallel universes? If we are, then why didn’t God create us with the ability to do so naturally? We do we have to consume psychedelic drugs or meditate for years to tap into these different channels? Why isn’t it as easy as clicking a button on a remote?

If we had the answer, then we wouldn’t be sitting here entertaining the idea of altered states of consciousness. We don’t know if we’re allowed to tap into them; Adam and Eve ate the fruit from the forbidden tree and look what resulted from their actions! We live in a world of suffering.

But the answer to the original question is that we are capable of tapping into different channels for our pleasure. You can either take the long route of practicing meditation for years or the short route of consuming psychedelic drugs such as psilocybin, LSD or DMT. Either method will help you tap into altered states of consciousness.

Your brain is like a television. It’s your choice whether you want to upgrade your provider and get more channels or remain with the basics.

Are you Ready? (This is Defeating Stigma Mindfully)

Psychedelic Momentum

Psilocybin magic mushroom growing in nature

Psilocybin On The Horizon

The first US center for psychedelic research has opened up at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. For over 50 years, psychedelics have been outlawed by the U.S. government and classified as schedule I drugs. Schedule I drugs are regarded as having no medical benefits as per the federal government. Some of these include marijuana, MDMA, heroin and peyote.

This is very exciting news, as just recently the FDA granted psilocybin breakthrough therapy designation for major depression. Psilocybin is the active ingredient in hallucinogenic mushrooms or “magic mushrooms.” They have been used for thousands of years by indigenous tribes in South America and by Native Americans in the U.S., for spiritual, medicinal and mystical experiences.

It is not yet known how psilocybin works on the brain and how it potentially helps depressed patients. It is thought that it rewires the brain circuits by shutting down bad connections and sprouting new good ones. Consider this analogy: a person living in the financial distract of Manhattan does not have too much contact with people in the upper west side. But if consistent contact were to be made, a potentially new fruitful connection could be established, benefiting people from both places.

It’s also believed that the actual psychedelic experience of hallucinations in a controlled therapeutic environment, helps patients to confront their demons, resulting in the alleviation of their pain and suffering. This method is much different than your conventional antidepressants, which provide no mystical experiences and take up to 4-6 weeks for therapeutic effects to be noticed.

Psychedelics were once used in the field of psychiatry back in the 1950s, until they were classified as schedule I drugs in 1970 under the Controlled Substances Act. Psychedelics were never meant to leave the laboratory, but they were unfortunately introduced to the masses, sparking the Hippie movement which glorified the use of psychedelics. In return, this motivated the U.S. government to outlaw the sacred compounds.

These new times are much more promising for the use of psychedelics. The hope is that the evidence will be present in regards to establishing therapeutic value for mental health disorders. Any new tools which can help alleviate the mental health suffering of millions of people around the world, is a step in the right direction!

Are you Ready? (This is Defeating Stigma Mindfully)

Unique Keys To Mental Illness

Focus photography of psychedelics used for treating mental illness

Psychedelics For All Walks Of Life

Can chemical compounds such as DMT, psilocybin, LSD and mescaline be one day utilized to treat mental illness? MDMA is already in phase 3 clinical trials for the treatment of PTSD. Defeating mental illness has already proven to be a difficult challenge for the medical community, with many drugs simply not touching the pathology responsible for these destructive conditions.

Psychedelics may one day prove to be unique keys to mental illness because of the altered states of consciousness in which they provide. It’s not necessarily their mechanism of action in the brain which is proving to be useful, but the meaningful and profound experiences which they provide for users.

Many patients in clinical trials have reported relief in their anxiety and depressive symptoms after having meaningful trips on psilocybin. The idea is that hallucinogens force the user to confront their troubles and unconscious conflicts directly in the trip; their madness comes out in a controlled and supervised medical setting.

Perhaps anxiety and depression is much more complex than the monoamine hypothesis of not having enough serotonin circulating in the synaptic cleft. Perhaps the reason why psychedelics are proving to work against these mental illnesses is because they directly tackle the unconscious conflicts which have gone haywire; psychedelics help the user untangle the intricate and sticky unconscious webs.

One exciting point about hallucinogens is that they’re non-addictive; no one wakes up everyday and states, “I want to trip on ibogaine today.” This is because hallucinogens provide such powerful experiences, that the mind simply does not have energy to “trip” on a consistent basis. This prevents users from becoming addicted.

Throughout history, psychedelics have been regarded as sacred medicines used for guidance, learning and healing. They were even previously used in the field of psychiatry in the 1950s before they left the laboratory and blew up into the free love social movement. In return, the Nixon administration viewed hallucinogens as a threat to the mind and soul of America’s youth and made them schedule I drugs; the research was buried underground.

As more traction is gained regarding the research studies on psychedelics, maybe one day we will be able to utilize these powerful medicines to help alleviate mental illness, and provide a higher quality of life for people from all walks of life.

Are you Ready? (This is Defeating Stigma Mindfully)