I Am A Great Communicator

Businesswomen talking and smiling in front of laptop

Positive Affirmation: Great Communication Skills

“I am a great communicator because I focus on what others have to say rather than dominating the conversation. People look up to me not because I have impressive things to say, but because I have great listening skills and they appreciate the time and attention that I give them. I talk at the right time and people pay more attention to what I say because I’m usually attentively listening to what they have to say. When I talk less and listen more, others are more willing to hear what I have to say as compared to when I talk more and listen less. I am a great communicator because I use empathy in my conversations and feel the other person out, especially when they are in pain and emotional turmoil. I am a great communicator and others appreciate my presence!”

Are you Ready? (This is Defeating Stigma Mindfully)

How Are You, Really?

Two brunette women talking and smiling next to blue vase with green plant

Mental Health During The Coronavirus Pandemic

As mental illness continues to rise as the pandemic progresses, many of us continue to ignore how others around us are doing because we are too busy focusing on ourselves. Some of us continue to be polite and show interest in others, but deep inside, we only care about ourselves, hoping that the conversation will focus on us and not the other person. But this is the problem with society; we care more to address how we are feeling than how others are feeling. This has to be changed.

From now on, rather than superficially asking another person “How are you?”, let’s add an extra word and take it a step further, “How are you, really?” By just adding one extra word, you place so much more emphasis on the question by showing the other person that you’re willing to engage and listen on a deeper level. This results in the other person opening up about things that he or she would have never previously opened up about.

One approach that you should start using with anyone who you interact with is focusing on what they really have to stay and not what you want to hear. You may not be trained to do so as you’ve been living your entire life focusing on what you have to say or not really listening when others are talking to you. But it’s time to retrain the way you interact with others and this starts by attentively listening to others’ emotions and struggles.

It’s actually fun when you make conversations less about you and more about them. Developing your listening skills is a great tool to have because it actually sets you up in a better position during conversations; it prevents you from divulging unnecessary information without first processing it. It also helps you learn more about others and their ways, helping you understand how different people function and view the world.

People will also appreciate your time more when they see that you really care about what they’re saying. The truth is that even if you try this approach, you may not really care all that much about what others are saying, but with time and practice, it will become part of your repertoire and you will see that you’ll actually start to enjoy listening to what others have to say about themselves.

But most importantly, do it for mental health. So many people are afraid to share their struggles, believing that others don’t care or will make fun of them. Let’s change that for good. Let’s show humanity that we are different and that we are here to help others open up and talk about their struggles with mental illness. We are here to carefully listen and guide others, providing them with hope, strength and power.

How are you, really? Try it.

Are you Ready? (This is Defeating Stigma Mindfully)

Connecting With The Human Inside

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People Just Want To Be Heard

What people continue to miss on a daily basis is the importance of listening to others when they speak. So many of us are inclined to express what we have to say, not really taking into consideration what others have to say. Oftentimes, we want to get in what is on our mind despite the other person trying to express themselves. It’s almost like a race of who controls the conversation first, except that no one controls it when we don’t listen well to what others have to say.

This is especially true when it comes to psychiatric patients. Many doctors are quick to dismiss what they have to say out of the sake of time. Even family members just cancel out their messages for noise, as if they are wearing noise-canceling headphones during conversations. Psychiatric patients are more fragile to begin with because of the mental illness that they are suffering from; someone speaking over them does not mix well with their emotions and thoughts.

By listening more carefully and attentively, people will appreciate your time and presence much more than if you’re just there to speak all the time. Have you ever tried just listening to someone talk, even if it means sacrificing your spotlight in the moment? It’s quite enjoyable actually when you surrender your platform and allow others to dance on it for a little while.

This is because when you listen attentively, you get to learn more about others’ thoughts, emotions and behavior. Think of it like a chess match: aggressively making moves without studying your opponent will only lead to a checkmate or at best a draw. But when you take your time to listen to the other person and understand where they’re coming from, you put yourself in a better position to connect and help them.

So don’t always be quick to control a conversation. Some of the smartest and wisest people in life are actually the best listeners; they pay attention to every small detail and only talk when necessary, not revealing too much information but just the right amount that proves to be sufficient in the conversation. If you can learn to master your listening skills, then you will be able to connect much more effectively in your daily interactions.

We need more great listeners in this world and especially in the mental health field!

Are you Ready? (This is Defeating Stigma Mindfully)