Isolation and Depression

Some of us never felt isolated prior to the pandemic while many of us became even more isolated during this time. Either way, isolation is a breeding ground for mental illness. Three ways of dealing with isolation and depression include going outside, socializing and exercising. While it may seem obvious, you’d be surprised at how many people avoid taking advantage of being outdoors, socializing more in person or exercising to improve their physical and mental health.

Isolation and depression: sad woman with hands on window

Isolation and Depression: The Solution

Start off by spending more time outdoors. When people are depressed, they tend to isolate in their home and lose interest in the outside world. This is exactly what the illness wants you to do, but there is nothing good about it. To counteract this urge to isolate and become even more depressed, force yourself to spend time outdoors. Something as simple as going for a walk in your neighborhood or park can help you feel better. Sure, there’s nothing exciting about walking, but seeing people and breathing fresh air can help.

Secondly, force yourself to exercise, even if it’s walking. Exercise is great for mental health and can make you feel awesome when those endorphines are released. A boost in confidence provided by exercising is exactly what you need when feeling depressed. It doesn’t have to be anything fancy. You don’t have to lift heavy weights or get a Peloton bike. Maybe try jogging or if you already belong to a gym, hop on those machines and exercise with very light weights. There is something magical about exercising. It’s definitely a natural remedy for poor mental health.

Lastly, you have to talk to people. Depressed people who isolate are at increased risk for suicide than depressed people who still socialize and engage with others. Isolation is a breeding ground for depression because a lack of people promotes negative thought cycles. Isolation can cause thoughts such as, “no one likes me anyway,” “even if I kill myself, no one would care; they probably wouldn’t even notice.” So keep in touch with your friends and family and tell them how you’re feeling. They may be the reason you end up receiving the professional care you deserve.

Are you Ready? (This is Defeating Stigma Mindfully)

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